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Top comments books mentioned on stackoverflow.com

Clean Code

Robert C. Martin

An extremely pragmatic method for writing better code from the start, and ultimately producing more robust applications.

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Code Complete

Steve McConnell

Features the best practices in the art and science of constructing software--topics include design, applying good techniques to construction, eliminating errors, planning, managing construction activities, and relating personal character to superior software. Original. (Intermediate)

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Refactoring

Martin Fowler, Kent Beck

Users can dramatically improve the design, performance, and manageability of object-oriented code without altering its interfaces or behavior. "Refactoring" shows users exactly how to spot the best opportunities for refactoring and exactly how to do it, step by step.

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Joe Celko's Trees and Hierarchies in SQL for Smarties

Joe Celko

Expert advice for smarties is offered from the #1 SQL guru. Trees and hierarchies are topics that all SQL users need to know, and this is the first developer's guide that addresses these concepts that are universally difficult for programmers to master. The book is Web-enhanced with downloadable SQL code, ready to use.

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Hacker's Delight

Henry S. Warren

" "This is the first book that promises to tell the deep, dark secrets of computer arithmetic, and it delivers in spades. It contains every trick I knew plus many, many more. A godsend for library developers, compiler writers, and lovers of elegant hacks, it deserves a spot on your shelf right next to Knuth.""--Josh Bloch" "When I first saw the title, I figured that the book must be either a cookbook for breaking into computers (unlikely) or some sort of compendium of little programming tricks. It's the latter, but it's thorough, almost encyclopedic, in its coverage." "--Guy Steele These are the timesaving techniques relished by computer hackers--those devoted and persistent code developers who seek elegant and efficient ways to build better software. The truth is that much of the computer programmer's job involves a healthy mix of arithmetic and logic. In "Hacker's Delight," veteran programmer Hank Warren shares the tricks he has collected from his considerable experience in the worlds of application and system programming. Most of these techniques are eminently practical, but a few are included just because they are interesting and unexpected. The resulting work is an irresistible collection that will help even the most seasoned programmers better their craft. Topics covered include: A broad collection of useful programming tricks Small algorithms for common tasksPower-of-2 boundaries and bounds checkingRearranging bits and bytesInteger division and division by constantsSome elementary functions on integersGray codeHilbert's space-filling curveAnd even formulas for prime numbers! This book is for anyone who wants to create efficient code. "Hacker's Delight" will help you learn to program at a higher level--well beyond what is generally taught in schools and training courses--and will advance you substantially further than is possible through ordinary self-study alone. 0201914654B06272002

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Software Estimation

Steve McConnell

Covers software estimation techniques with information on how to successfully estimate scheduling, cost, and project activities.

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Writing Solid Code

Steve Maguire

A Microsoft developer examines the problem of programming "bugs," showing how and where developers make mistakes along the development process and providing ways users can detect errors early. Original.

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Code Complete

Steve McConnell

A practical guide to software design discusses the art and science of constructing software and provides examples in C, Pascal, BASIC, Fortran, and Ada, with a focus on successful programming techniques. Original.

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Code Craft

Pete Goodliffe

A guide to writing computer code covers such topics as variable naming, presentation style, error handling, and security.

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The Definitive ANTLR 4 Reference

Terence Parr

Programmers run into parsing problems all the time. Whether it's a data format like JSON, a network protocol like SMTP, a server configuration file for Apache, a PostScript/PDF file, or a simple spreadsheet macro language--ANTLR v4 and this book will demystify the process. ANTLR v4 has been rewritten from scratch to make it easier than ever to build parsers and the language applications built on top. This completely rewritten new edition of the bestselling Definitive ANTLR Reference shows you how to take advantage of these new features. Build your own languages with ANTLR v4, using ANTLR's new advanced parsing technology. In this book, you'll learn how ANTLR automatically builds a data structure representing the input (parse tree) and generates code that can walk the tree (visitor). You can use that combination to implement data readers, language interpreters, and translators. You'll start by learning how to identify grammar patterns in language reference manuals and then slowly start building increasingly complex grammars. Next, you'll build applications based upon those grammars by walking the automatically generated parse trees. Then you'll tackle some nasty language problems by parsing files containing more than one language (such as XML, Java, and Javadoc). You'll also see how to take absolute control over parsing by embedding Java actions into the grammar. You'll learn directly from well-known parsing expert Terence Parr, the ANTLR creator and project lead. You'll master ANTLR grammar construction and learn how to build language tools using the built-in parse tree visitor mechanism. The book teaches using real-world examples and shows you how to use ANTLR to build such things as a data file reader, a JSON to XML translator, an R parser, and a Java class->interface extractor. This book is your ticket to becoming a parsing guru! What You Need: ANTLR 4.0 and above. Java development tools. Ant build system optional(needed for building ANTLR from source)

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The LaTex Web Companion

Michel Goossens, S. P. Q. Rahtz, Sebastian Rahtz

Published Jun 10, 1999 by Addison-Wesley Professional. Part of the Tools and Techniques for Computer Typesetting series. The series editor may be contacted at frank.mittelbach@latex-project.org. This book shows how you can publish LaTeX documents on the Web. LaTeX was born of the scientist's need to prepare well-formatted information, particularly with pictures and mathematics included; the Web was born of the scientist's need to communicate information electronically. Until now, it has been difficult to find solutions that address both needs. HTML and today's Web browsers deal inadequately with the nontextual components of scientific documents. This book, at last, describes tools and techniques for transforming LaTeX sources into Web formats for electronic publication, and for transforming Web sources into LaTeX documents for optimal printing. "You will learn how to: " Make full use of Acrobat with LaTeX Convert existing documents to HTML or XML Use mathematics in Web applications Use LaTeX to prepare Web pages Read and write simple XML/SGML Produce high-quality printed pages from Web-hosted XML or HTML pages "You will find practical descriptions of: " LaTeX2HTML, which uses Perl to interpret LaTeX source and generate HTML TeX4ht, which redefines LaTeX's macros to generate HTML or XML Browser plugins, such as techexplorer, that are able to interpret mathematical markup directly Tools for authoring and interpreting XML Tools for translating XML into various output formats, using Cascading Style Sheets, DSSSL, or XSL Mathematical Markup Language (MathML) In addition to giving the Internet location of the software described in this book, the authors also provide a full, annotated catalogue of URLs for the standards and documentation relating to this fast-moving area. Many of the packages and programs described in this book are freely available in public software archives, and the source code for examples has been placed on CTAN, the TeX archives. 0201433117B04062001

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Practical Vim

Drew Neil

Vim is a fast and efficient text editor that will make you a faster and more efficient developer. It's available on almost every OS--if you master the techniques in this book, you'll never need another text editor. Practical Vim shows you 120 vim recipes so you can quickly learn the editor's core functionality and tackle your trickiest editing and writing tasks. Vim, like its classic ancestor vi, is a serious tool for programmers, web developers, and sysadmins. No other text editor comes close to Vim for speed and efficiency; it runs on almost every system imaginable and supports most coding and markup languages. Learn how to edit text the "Vim way:" complete a series of repetitive changes with The Dot Formula, using one keystroke to strike the target, followed by one keystroke to execute the change. Automate complex tasks by recording your keystrokes as a macro. Run the same command on a selection of lines, or a set of files. Discover the "very magic" switch, which makes Vim's regular expression syntax more like Perl's. Build complex patterns by iterating on your search history. Search inside multiple files, then run Vim's substitute command on the result set for a project-wide search and replace. All without installing a single plugin! You'll learn how to navigate text documents as fast as the eye moves--with only a few keystrokes. Jump from a method call to its definition with a single command. Use Vim's jumplist, so that you can always follow the breadcrumb trail back to the file you were working on before. Discover a multilingual spell-checker that does what it's told. Practical Vim will show you new ways to work with Vim more efficiently, whether you're a beginner or an intermediate Vim user. All this, without having to touch the mouse. What You Need: Vim version 7

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